Friday, December 14, 2012

Omaha Sioux Indian Pipes


Omaha Sioux Indian Pipes

Smoking Paraphernalia.

fig315Fig. 315.—Omaha calumet
The pipes in use among the Omaha are of three kinds: the sacred pipe (niniba waqube, mysterious pipe), including the war pipes and those used by the chiefs in making peace; the niniba weawan or calumet (illustrated in figure 315), used in the calumet dance or dance of adoption,1 and the hatchet pipe or manzepe niniba, introduced since the coming of the white man. One form of the pipe used on ordinary [Tobacco pouches (nini├║jiha) were made of deer or antelope skin, and were ornamented with porcupine quills or a fringe of deerskin. Sometimes buffalo bladders were used for this purpose. The women used them as receptacles for their porcupine quills.
occasions is shown in figure 316. This pipe has a bowl of catlinite, and the stem is decorated with horsehair.
fig316Fig. 316.—Omaha pipe used on ordinary occasions.

See "Omaha Sociology," Third Ann. Rept. Bur. Ethnology, chap. vi.